second nature

If you love nature, don't live in it

second nature

Ecosocialism, urban issues, technology, and anything else that strikes my fancy.

"[Scholars] are increasingly using ethnographic methods to investigate numerous social issues, including homelessness, gentrification, policing, migration, street vendors, activism, poverty and youth subcultures, among others. In a rapidly globalising world, with exacerbated inequalities between rich and poor, ethnography is ideally suited for unravelling the politics of survival at the micro scale as situated within larger socio-economic processes."



- Kevin Ward - Researching the City (2014)



"In the past nine months, Germany set an impressive new benchmark: For the first time, it got more electricity from renewable sources — 27.7% of total demand — than from any other source of energy."



"Climate change is a crisis of justice among human beings. We all depend on this planet, but some are more insulated from its undoing than others. Some will be bailed out, but most won’t. Some will find a way to profit as the waters rise, but many more will drown. The challenge of stemming climate change is not just a matter of raising consciousness and spreading awareness; it is a struggle for democracy and survival."



"But at the moment, we are only being offered one particular story about the deployment of networked informatics in the urban milieu, and though it is widely predominant in the cultura it only portrays the narrowest sliver of what it is possible. This is the vision of the “smart city."



- GREENFIELD, Adam (2013) Against the smart city, Do Projects, Nueva York  (via humanscalecities)



"When we talk about new technologies, it is often about their practical application: technology is presented as a convenient solution to real or supposed problems, it promises to make our lives more pleasant and convenient; at the same time, our cities will also become safer, more sustainable and more efficient. In short, technology is an almost inescapable magical power that will improve urban society. But for those who do not believe in magic, this picture mainly raises a number of questions."



- DE WAAL, Martijn (2013) The city as interface. How new media are changing the city, Nai 010, Rotterdam (via humanscalecities)



"By far the greatest latitude of choice exists the very first time a particular instrument, system, or technique is introduced. Because choices tend to become strongly fixed in material equipment, economic investment, and social habit, the original flexibility vanishes for all practical purposes once the initial commitments are made. In that sense technological innovations are similar to legislative acts or political foundings that establish a framework for public order that will endure over many generations."



- WINNER, Langdon (1985), “Do Artifacts Have Politics?,” EN D. MACKENZIE y J. WAJCMAN (ed.), The Social Shaping of Technology, Open University Press, Bristol.  (via humanscalecities)



thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory
By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 
Zoom Info
thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory
By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 
Zoom Info
thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory
By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 
Zoom Info
thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory
By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 
Zoom Info
thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory
By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 
Zoom Info
thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory
By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects
via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 
Zoom Info

thisbigcity:

ombuarchitecture:

Tietgen Dormitory

By Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects

via archdaily

21st century courtyard building. 

"There were only 9 electric street railways operating in the American cities in 1885 but 789 by 1890, 982 by 1902, and 1,260 by 1912"



- Christine Boyer, Dreaming The Rational City (via secretrepublic)



"Most public space is used for recreational purposes most of the time, and who uses various kinds of public space how much for these and other purposes is an important research topic. Whether and how people use parks, playgrounds, pools, and beaches is not only relevant to the sociology of leisure but it is also of importance to government, particularly since budgets for such spaces are usually the first to be cut when tax receipts decline. In low density communities, the major users of public recreational space are probably people who cannot afford to buy or rent homes with private outdoor space."



- Herbert J. Gans - ‘The Sociology of Space: A Use-Centered View’ (2002)



newsweek:

Dramatic Photos of California’s Historic Drought - In Focus - The Atlantic

"I wasn’t against communism, but i can’t say i was for it either. At first, i viewed it suspiciously, as some kind of white man’s concoction, until i read works by African revolutionaries and studied the African liberation movements. Revolutionaries in Africa understood that the question of African liberation was not just a question of race, that even if they managed to get rid of the white colonialists, if they didn’t rid themselves of the capitalistic economic structure, the white colonialists would simply be replaced by Black neocolonialists. There was not a single liberation movement in Africa that was not fighting for socialism. In fact, there was not a single liberation movement in the whole world that was fighting for capitalism. The whole thing boiled down to a simple equation: anything that has any kind of value is made, mined, grown, produced, and processed by working people. So why shouldn’t working people collectively own that wealth? Why shouldn’t working people own and control their own resources? Capitalism meant that rich businessmen owned the wealth, while socialism meant that the people who made the wealth owned it."



- Assata Shakur, Assata: An Autobiography (via rs620)



"Civilizations and governments rise and fall; traditions, values, and policies change; but the natural environment of each city remains an enduring framework within which the human community builds. A city’s natural environment and its urban form, taken together, comprise a record of the interaction between natural processes and human purpose over time. Together, they contribute to each city’s identity."



- Spirn (1984) ‘The Granite Garden: Urban Nature and Human Design (via sociology-of-space)



ceevee5:

Candy Chang
thisbigcity:

Which city quotes inspire you? Share them with us and we might include them in this series!

thisbigcity:

Which city quotes inspire you? Share them with us and we might include them in this series!